Best Special Instrument Microphones

By Heidi Walsh | Last Updated on Nov 14, 2021

In Hurry? Editor's Choice:

AKG Pro Audio C516 ML Professional Miniature Condenser Instrument Microphone
TOP 1
AKG Pro Audio C516 ML Professional Miniature Condenser Instrument Microphone
TR score rating icon 9.7
TR Score
Thomann ACM-01
TOP 2
Thomann ACM-01
TR score rating icon 9.7
TR Score
the t.bone Ovid System CC 100 RC
TOP 3
the t.bone Ovid System CC 100 RC
TR score rating icon 9.7
TR Score
How To Choose Special Instrument Microphones: Methodology

The best Special Instrument Microphones ranking is based on our detailed evaluation and analysis of over 49,953 consumer satisfaction surveys. We have come up with the top 3 Special Instrument Microphones you might be interested in and rated them on factors such as Characteristic experience.

* Our experienced editors are constantly reviewing the latest news, looking at data analytics in order to recommend only products worth your time and money. As Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

A Detailed List of Top 3 Special Instrument Microphones in 2021

#TOP 1

AKG Pro Audio C516 ML Professional Miniature Condenser Instrument Microphone

7.8 x 5.5 x 2.7 inches
C516 ML
0.86 Pounds

Reviews for AKG Pro Audio (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.7

Features

Detachable Microphone Cable, Easy To Install And Service
Cardioid Polar Pattern For Problem-Free Use With High Ambient Noise Rejection
Flexible Shock Mount For Efficient Suppression Of Mechanical And Body Noise
Established As An Industry-Standard Accordion Mic
Rugged, Highly Stable Gooseneck For Precise Placement Of The Microphone
Detachable Microphone Cable, Easy To Install And Service
Cardioid Polar Pattern For Problem-Free Use With High Ambient Noise Rejection
Flexible Shock Mount For Efficient Suppression Of Mechanical And Body Noise
Established As An Industry-Standard Accordion Mic
Rugged, Highly Stable Gooseneck For Precise Placement Of The Microphone

Thomann ACM-01

Reviews for Thomann (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.7

Features

Polar Pattern: Omnidirectional (For Installation In The Accordion)
Treble / Bass Controls
2 Treble And Bass Condenser Microphone 1
Includng Assembly Instructions (Velcro Strip Is Glued On The Inside Under The Treble And Bass Top And The Microphones - Which Also Have Hook And Loop Connection - Attached) And Feeding Adapter (9V)
Frequency Response: 50 To 19,000 Hz
Jack-Out
Max. SPL: 135 DB
Power Adapter (9V)
Polar Pattern: Omnidirectional (For Installation In The Accordion)
Treble / Bass Controls
2 Treble And Bass Condenser Microphone 1
Includng Assembly Instructions (Velcro Strip Is Glued On The Inside Under The Treble And Bass Top And The Microphones - Which Also Have Hook And Loop Connection - Attached) And Feeding Adapter (9V)
Frequency Response: 50 To 19,000 Hz
Jack-Out
Max. SPL: 135 DB
Power Adapter (9V)
#TOP 3

the t.bone Ovid System CC 100 RC

Cardoid

Reviews for the t.bone (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.7

Features

Easy Installation With Different Instrument Holders (Optional - Not Included)
Cable Length: 1.2 M
3-Pin Mini XLR Connector For Operating With T.Bone Wireless Systems - Also Suitable For AKG Wireless Systems
Length Of Gooseneck: 130 Mm
Foam Windshield Included
Optional Cables With Sennheiser EW And Shure TQG Connector Available Separately (Not Included)
Flexible Gooseneck For Easy Alignment On The Instrument
Detachable Cable With Screw Contact
Frequency Range: 20 - 20,000 Hz
Directivity: Cardioid
With Phantom Power Adapter (Phantom Power Required)
Easy Installation With Different Instrument Holders (Optional - Not Included)
Cable Length: 1.2 M
3-Pin Mini XLR Connector For Operating With T.Bone Wireless Systems - Also Suitable For AKG Wireless Systems
Length Of Gooseneck: 130 Mm
Foam Windshield Included
Optional Cables With Sennheiser EW And Shure TQG Connector Available Separately (Not Included)
Flexible Gooseneck For Easy Alignment On The Instrument
Detachable Cable With Screw Contact
Frequency Range: 20 - 20,000 Hz
Directivity: Cardioid
With Phantom Power Adapter (Phantom Power Required)

Best Special Instrument Microphones — FAQ

What are the 4 types of mics?

There are 4 types of microphone:

  • Dynamic Microphones.
  • Large Diaphram Condensor Microphones.
  • Small Diaphram Condensor Microphones.
  • Ribbon Microphones.

However, is a microphone a musical instrument?

Technically, microphones are not musical instruments; they are transducers. Transducers refer to any appliance that converts the input into electrical currents; in the case of a microphone, the sound is the input being converted.

Thus, what are the 3 types of microphone pickup patterns?

Before we get into some specific benefits for the stage and studio, let's review the basic polar (or pickup) patterns. There are three basic types: omnidirectional, unidirectional and bidirectional (also called figure-of-eight).

And, what are the 3 types of microphones?

Each of the three primary types of microphonesdynamic microphones, condenser microphones, and ribbon microphoneshas a different method for converting sound into electrical signals.

Indeed, what's the difference between condenser and dynamic mics?

Dynamic microphones turn sound waves into a voltage with the use of a magnet.Condenser microphones work on the principle of variable capacitance. In simple terms, they work as a battery. Sound waves vibrate the diaphragm with a magnetic plate that's behind it.

Similarly, what are the two main types of microphones?

The Dynamic Microphone and the Condenser Microphone are the main microphone types that you will be using in the studio or recording environment. The Ribbon Microphone is less common than the other two types and is only used by professionals.

Meanwhile, who invented microphone?

James Edward Maceo West

Nonetheless, what are polar patterns in microphones?

Polar patterns refer to the sensitivity of any given microphone to sounds arriving from different angles, to its central axis. As we can see, the shape of the polar pattern touches the outermost circle at zero degrees, falling below -5 dB at the 90 and 270 decibel points.

Beside this, what is an instrument microphone?

Instrument mics tend to be used with a wider range of instruments, from kick drums to bass and guitar, so they often provide a wider frequency range. For example, an instrument mic's frequency response is usually around 40Hz to 15kHz, which can accommodate the low E string of a bass guitar, which is 41Hz.

In addition, is a microphone input or output?

Is a microphone an input or an output device? Microphones are input devices because they input information into a computer. Note that the mic signal must be converted into digital data before it can be sent to and used by a computer.

Next, what is microphone condenser?

Condenser (or capacitor) microphones are commonly used in studios to pick up sounds with great detail and accuracy. This is accomplished with a lightweight membrane (referred to as the diaphragm) suspended by a fixed plate. Sound pressure against the diaphragm causes it to move, which in turn creates electrical output.

Our Verdict

With so many Special Instrument Microphones available, it's difficult to know which one is best. Fortunately, our research team compiled an unbiased list of 25 best Special Instrument Microphones that will fit every budget. During this study there were over 45107 products across 25 brands. Our verdict: most customers choose Special Instrument Microphones with an average price tag of $561!

Heidi Walsh
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Heidi Walsh is the founder a company that specializes in manufacturing high-quality microphones for professional musicians and recording artists. She has extensive experience in the field, having spent years as an engineer at various audio companies. With her knowledge and expertise, she was able to craft a product that would be both affordable and durable. Her goal is to equip every musician with the tools they need to succeed!