Best Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments

By Joel Hammond | Last Updated on Nov 14, 2021

In Hurry? Editor's Choice:

Yamaha YAC 1075BKP Clarinet Thumb Rest Cushion, Black
TOP 1
Yamaha YAC 1075BKP Clarinet Thumb Rest Cushion, Black
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Thomann Cork Plate 1,5 mm
TOP 2
Thomann Cork Plate 1,5 mm
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Thomann Cork Plate 1,0 mm
TOP 3
Thomann Cork Plate 1,0 mm
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
How To Choose Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments: Methodology

The best Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments ranking is based on our detailed evaluation and analysis of over 75,849 consumer satisfaction surveys. We have come up with the top 3 Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments you might be interested in and rated them on factors such as Compatible To: and Material experience.

* Our experienced editors are constantly reviewing the latest news, looking at data analytics in order to recommend only products worth your time and money. As Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

A Detailed List of Top 3 Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments in 2021

#TOP 1

Yamaha YAC 1075BKP Clarinet Thumb Rest Cushion, Black

8 x 4 x 0.25 inches
YAC 1075BKP
0.48 ounces

Reviews for Yamaha (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Black
Country Of Origin: UNITED STATES
Fits Over Your Thumbrest
Relieves The Pressure On Your Thumb
Black
Country Of Origin: UNITED STATES
Fits Over Your Thumbrest
Relieves The Pressure On Your Thumb
#TOP 2

Thomann Cork Plate 1,5 mm

Reviews for Thomann (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Thickness: 1.5 Mm
Finely Pored
Size: 300 X 100 Mm
Thickness: 1.5 Mm
Finely Pored
Size: 300 X 100 Mm
#TOP 3

Thomann Cork Plate 1,0 mm

Reviews for Thomann (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Thickness: 1.0 Mm
Size: 300 X 100 Mm
Finely Pored
Thickness: 1.0 Mm
Size: 300 X 100 Mm
Finely Pored

Best Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments — FAQ

What are the parts of a woodwind instrument?

The Woodwind Family. The instruments in this family all used to be made of wood, which gives them their name. Today, they are made of wood, metal, plastic or some combination. They are all basically narrow cylinders or pipes, with holes, an opening at the bottom end and a mouthpiece at the top.

In addition, what happens when you cover the holes on a woodwind instrument?

Closing the hole increases the effective length and lowers the pitch again. However, a pipe with a closed tone hole is not acoustically identical to a pipe with no hole; the shape of the fingertip or pad that closes the hole modifies the pipe's internal volume and effective length.

Also, what is the rarest woodwind instrument?

sordone, rare double-reed wind instrument of the 16th and 17th centuries, an early precursor of the bassoon. It differs from the curtal, the bassoon's direct predecessor, in having a cylindrical bore (a bassoon bore is conical).

Thus, what are the pads on woodwind instruments made of?

Flutes, saxophones, and larger woodwinds (like the bass clarinet and the bassoon) will often have pads made of leather - namely kidskin. Leather is a type of protein. Leather may also be used on clarinets and other reed instruments. Another mateiral which has been found suitable for pads is cork.

On the other hand, what materials are used for wind instruments?

Despite the name, a woodwind may be made of any material, not just wood. Common examples include brass, silver, cane, as well as other metals such as gold and platinum. The saxophone, for example, though made of brass, is considered a woodwind because it requires a reed to produce sound.

Beside this, how is sound produced in woodwind instruments?

Woodwind instruments (clarinet, oboe) Air is blown across the reed attached to the mouthpiece of the instrument, vibrating the air down the tube of the instrument to produce sounds.Different notes are produced by changing the tension of the strings or the size of the instrument box.

Likewise, how does a flute produce different pitches?

Woodwind pitch depends on the volume of air that is vibrating. A larger volume vibrates more slowly, for lower pitch; a smaller volume vibrates more quickly, for a higher pitch. For most woodwinds, the player changes pitch by opening and closing holes along the instrument's length.

Eventually, what is one woodwind instrument that does not have a reed?

The flute
The flute is different to the other members of the woodwind family as it does not use a reed, instead sound is produced by the flow of air across the opening, which makes the flute an aerophone instrument.

Nevertheless, what do you call the hole on a flute?

The head joint is where the sound of the flute originates as the player blows air into the flute through the embouchure hole (also known as the blow hole or mouth hole). The embouchure hole is in the center of the lip plate (or embouchure plate) that anchors the lips to the flute.

However, what is the newest woodwind instrument?

New Woodwind Instruments

  • Yamaha YTS 875EX Custom EX Professional Tenor Saxophone.
  • Yamaha YTS 82ZII Custom Z Professional Tenor Saxophone.
  • Yamaha YTS 62III Professional Tenor Saxophone.
  • Yamaha YSS 875EXHG Custom EX Professional Soprano Saxophone.
  • Yamaha YPC32 Piccolo.
  • Yamaha YPC-82 Professional Piccolo.

Nonetheless, why are they called woodwind instruments?

The reason reed woodwind instruments are identified as woodwind is based on the way they produce their sound which is by splitting the player's air stream on a sharp edge, such as a reed. Many people are confused by the name woodwind, thinking that these instruments should be made exclusively from wood.

Our Verdict

With so many Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments available, it's difficult to know which one is best. Fortunately, our research team compiled an unbiased list of 26 best Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments that will fit every budget. During this study there were over 36204 products across 26 brands. Our verdict: most customers choose Spare Parts For Woodwind Instruments with an average price tag of $25!

Joel Hammond
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joel Hammond is the CEO and Founder of, a company that specializes in wind instrument repairs and maintenance. He started the business as a way to connect with other musicians, but got serious about it after noticing how much people needed his services. Joel has been repairing instruments for over ten years now, and he’s seen all sorts of problems from broken keys to cracked seams! He enjoys spending time at home with his wife and two dogs.