Best Moving Heads - Beam

By Christopher Porter | Last Updated on Nov 14, 2021

In Hurry? Editor's Choice:

Fun Generation PicoBeam 30 Quad LED
TOP 1
Fun Generation PicoBeam 30 Quad LED
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Varytec Hero Wash 340FX RGBW Zoom
TOP 2
Varytec Hero Wash 340FX RGBW Zoom
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Stairville MH-100 Beam 36x3W LED
TOP 3
Stairville MH-100 Beam 36x3W LED
TR score rating icon 9.6
TR Score
How To Choose Moving Heads - Beam: Methodology

The best Moving Heads - Beam ranking is based on our detailed evaluation and analysis of over 69,420 consumer satisfaction surveys. We have come up with the top 3 Moving Heads - Beam you might be interested in and rated them on factors such as Light Output, Color Mixing, Type Of Lamp, Number Of Color Wheels and Power Of The Light experience.

* Our experienced editors are constantly reviewing the latest news, looking at data analytics in order to recommend only products worth your time and money. As Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

A Detailed List of Top 3 Moving Heads - Beam in 2021

#TOP 1

Fun Generation PicoBeam 30 Quad LED

30 W
LED
RGBW

Features

Dimensions (L X W X H): 174 X 172 X 235 Mm
Power Supply: AC 100-240 V, 50/60 Hz
Dimming: 0 - 100%
Light Source: 1X 30W High Performance RGBW QuadColor LED
3 DMX Channel Modes: 3, 8 Or 13 Channels
540&Deg; Pan, 230&Deg; Tilt (16 Bit)
Inversion Mode On Pan And Tilt Axis For Synchronised Mirrored Effects
Infrared Remote Control Included
Display With 4 Buttons For All Settings
Beam Angle: 4&Deg;
Shutter: 0 - 20 Hz
Pan / Tilt Inversion Mode
DMX Input And Output: 3 Pin XLR
Ideal For Bands, Mobile DJs, Entertainers, Mobile Stages, Artists, Clubs, Bars, Discos And Much More
3 Modes: DMX-512, Sound-To-Light &Amp; Auto Mode
Weight: 3 Kg
Power Consumption: 46 W
5 Integrated Shows
RGBW Color Mixing (Color Split In The Beam)
Omega Bracket Included
Dimensions (L X W X H): 174 X 172 X 235 Mm
Power Supply: AC 100-240 V, 50/60 Hz
Dimming: 0 - 100%
Light Source: 1X 30W High Performance RGBW QuadColor LED
3 DMX Channel Modes: 3, 8 Or 13 Channels
540&Deg; Pan, 230&Deg; Tilt (16 Bit)
Inversion Mode On Pan And Tilt Axis For Synchronised Mirrored Effects
Infrared Remote Control Included
Display With 4 Buttons For All Settings
Beam Angle: 4&Deg;
Shutter: 0 - 20 Hz
Pan / Tilt Inversion Mode
DMX Input And Output: 3 Pin XLR
Ideal For Bands, Mobile DJs, Entertainers, Mobile Stages, Artists, Clubs, Bars, Discos And Much More
3 Modes: DMX-512, Sound-To-Light &Amp; Auto Mode
Weight: 3 Kg
Power Consumption: 46 W
5 Integrated Shows
RGBW Color Mixing (Color Split In The Beam)
Omega Bracket Included
#TOP 2

Varytec Hero Wash 340FX RGBW Zoom

LED
120 W
RGBW

Reviews for Varytec (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Light Source: 3X 40W RGBW 4In1 LED
Continuous FX Rotation
Power Input And Output: Power Twist
Lux @ 2M (4&Deg;): 48000
OLED Display With Four Buttons
Dimensions (W X H X D): 255 X 368 X 187 Mm
Weight: 5.8 Kg
Black Housing Made Of Metal And Plastic
Connections: DMX Input And Output: XLR 3-Pin
Power Consumption: 134 W
Power Supply: 100-240 V AC / 50-60 Hz
Beam Angle: Motorised Zoom 4&Deg; - 45&Deg;
Electronic Shutter: 0 - 20 Hz
Electronic Dimmer: 0 - 100%
Control: DMX (8/16 Channels), Master / Slave, Automatic Built-In Programs, Music Control
16-Bit Pan / Tilt: 540&Deg; / 210&Deg; Degrees
Light Source: 3X 40W RGBW 4In1 LED
Continuous FX Rotation
Power Input And Output: Power Twist
Lux @ 2M (4&Deg;): 48000
OLED Display With Four Buttons
Dimensions (W X H X D): 255 X 368 X 187 Mm
Weight: 5.8 Kg
Black Housing Made Of Metal And Plastic
Connections: DMX Input And Output: XLR 3-Pin
Power Consumption: 134 W
Power Supply: 100-240 V AC / 50-60 Hz
Beam Angle: Motorised Zoom 4&Deg; - 45&Deg;
Electronic Shutter: 0 - 20 Hz
Electronic Dimmer: 0 - 100%
Control: DMX (8/16 Channels), Master / Slave, Automatic Built-In Programs, Music Control
16-Bit Pan / Tilt: 540&Deg; / 210&Deg; Degrees
#TOP 3

Stairville MH-100 Beam 36x3W LED

RGBW
LED
108 W

Reviews for Stairville (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.6

Features

The MH-100 Beam Projects A Very Narrow Beam That Sweeps Over The Stage Or Through The Club Like A Light Sword&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
The Optical System With An 8 &Deg; Beam Angle That Ensures An Almost Perfect Color Mixing In The Light Beam Itself&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
Control Is By Either DMX-512, Music-Controlled Or In Master / Slave Mode
Beam Moving Head With A Total Of 108 W LED Power And RGBW Color Mixing&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
The Light Output Of The MH-100 Beam Consists Of 36 CREE LEDs With 3 W Each&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
The MH-100 Beam Projects A Very Narrow Beam That Sweeps Over The Stage Or Through The Club Like A Light Sword&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
The Optical System With An 8 &Deg; Beam Angle That Ensures An Almost Perfect Color Mixing In The Light Beam Itself&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
Control Is By Either DMX-512, Music-Controlled Or In Master / Slave Mode
Beam Moving Head With A Total Of 108 W LED Power And RGBW Color Mixing&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;
The Light Output Of The MH-100 Beam Consists Of 36 CREE LEDs With 3 W Each&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;&Nbsp;

Best Moving Heads - Beam — FAQ

How does a moving head light work?

A moving head light looks like this:The moving mirror lights work from being mostly static, where the light beam is focussed, has colour and patterns applied, and shoots out the front lens, onto a mirror, which moves on two axis (up-down and left-right), but only around 135 degrees on each axis.

Nevertheless, what are 4 different types of moving lights?

They researched each fixture that was available to them and broke them down into 5 categories: EFX, Spot/Profile, Wash, Beam, and Hybrid.

Beside this, what is a beam moving light?

Beam moving heads belong to the youngest genre of moving show light. They were specially developed to produce a light beam that is as concentrated as possible and remains clearly visible even over very long distances.

And, who invented the moving head light?

Who made the first moving lights? There is evidence from the 1950s of a German company named Pani manufacturing multi-light systems with basic automation functionality.

Next, when were moving heads invented?

The prototype fixture shown to Genesis in 1980 was re-designated the "VL-zero" in the mid-1990s to keep the naming consistent. In 1985, the first moving head to use the DMX protocol was produced by Summa Technologies.

Still, when did moving head lights come out?

In 1981, Vari-Lite created the first modern moving head luminaire for entertainment, and ever since, lighting designers have used our luminaires for unforgettable rock and roll shows, moving dramatic performances, and a variety of high-impact events and installations.

Then, where should I move my heads?

Moving heads can be hung from truss or T-bars like any other light or set atop flat surfaces like truss totems. The light from a moving head is usually projected as a spot and often through a gobo, which shapes the light into various patterns and shapes.

Similarly, what are two features of moving lights?

Every moving light has its own special features: some have controllable shutters, others are able to zoom larger and smaller, some have prism effects.

Our Verdict

With so many Moving Heads - Beam available, it's difficult to know which one is best. Fortunately, our research team compiled an unbiased list of 25 best Moving Heads - Beam that will fit every budget. During this study there were over 39737 products across 25 brands. Our verdict: most customers choose Moving Heads - Beam with an average price tag of $812!

Christopher Porter
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Christopher Porter is a Lighting and Stage expert with over 6 years of experience in the industry. He has a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University and an MFA from New York University Tisch School of the Arts Graduate Acting Program. As a colorist he completed his training at Bobbi Brown Makeup Academy in New York City where he studied under world renowned makeup artist Bobbi Brown. In addition to his work as a designer Christopher enjoys teaching lighting design everyone who wants to develop in this direction, believing that his skill will pass to others.