Best Flute Head Joints

By Joel Hammond | Last Updated on Nov 14, 2021

In Hurry? Editor's Choice:

Pneumo Pro Wind Director with DVD Kit
TOP 1
Pneumo Pro Wind Director with DVD Kit
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Yamaha FHJ 200U Curved Headjoint
TOP 2
Yamaha FHJ 200U Curved Headjoint
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Jupiter Try-Out-Box
TOP 3
Jupiter Try-Out-Box
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
How To Choose Flute Head Joints: Methodology

The best Flute Head Joints ranking is based on our detailed evaluation and analysis of over 12,690 consumer satisfaction surveys. We have come up with the top 3 Flute Head Joints you might be interested in and rated them on factors such as Finish, Cup Diameter and Material experience.

* Our experienced editors are constantly reviewing the latest news, looking at data analytics in order to recommend only products worth your time and money. As Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

A Detailed List of Top 3 Flute Head Joints in 2021

#TOP 1

Pneumo Pro Wind Director with DVD Kit

4.8 ounces

Reviews for Pneumo Pro Wind Director (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Excellent For Developing Breath Support And Clean Double Tonguing.
Winner Of The NAMM "Best Tools For Schools Award."
The Amazing Flute Teaching Tool For Learning Beautiful Tone, Phrasing, And Correct Intonation During Dynamic Changes.
Excellent For Developing Breath Support And Clean Double Tonguing.
Winner Of The NAMM "Best Tools For Schools Award."
The Amazing Flute Teaching Tool For Learning Beautiful Tone, Phrasing, And Correct Intonation During Dynamic Changes.
#TOP 2

Yamaha FHJ 200U Curved Headjoint

German Silver Plated

Reviews for Yamaha (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

For YFL 211, 271, 281 And Also For 212, 272 And 282
Silver-Plated
Material: Nickel Silver
For YFL 211, 271, 281 And Also For 212, 272 And 282
Silver-Plated
Material: Nickel Silver
#TOP 3

Jupiter Try-Out-Box

0 Mm
Plastic

Reviews for Jupiter (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Versatile And Promotes Creativity
Cost Effective
100% Waterproof And Dishwasher Safe
These Test Mouthpieces For Wind Instruments Offer &Quot;The Smallest Instrument Carousel In The World&Quot;, And Are Developed On Traditional Instrument Making Techniques. They Are The Ideal Tool For Potential Music Students To Perform Their First Attempts At Blowing.
For Orchestra, Music Schools, Music Teachers, And Music Making In The Home
Simple And Robust
Easy To Use In Online Trainings
Hygienic
Versatile And Promotes Creativity
Cost Effective
100% Waterproof And Dishwasher Safe
These Test Mouthpieces For Wind Instruments Offer &Quot;The Smallest Instrument Carousel In The World&Quot;, And Are Developed On Traditional Instrument Making Techniques. They Are The Ideal Tool For Potential Music Students To Perform Their First Attempts At Blowing.
For Orchestra, Music Schools, Music Teachers, And Music Making In The Home
Simple And Robust
Easy To Use In Online Trainings
Hygienic

Best Flute Head Joints — FAQ

How do I choose a head joint?

A good headjoint should be capable of producing a good dynamic range. It should play very loudly in all three registers with a good quality of sound. It should also play quietly in all three registers whilst being controllable regarding pitch.

Then, what is the head joint on a flute?

The head joint is where the sound of the flute originates as the player blows air into the flute through the embouchure hole (also known as the blow hole or mouth hole). The embouchure hole is in the center of the lip plate (or embouchure plate) that anchors the lips to the flute.

Thus, what is a gold riser on a flute?

When a flutist blows into the headjoint, the air makes contact with the riser and causes the flute to vibrate and produce sound.For example, risers made out of 14 or 18 karat gold can add warmth and depth to the sound, as well as adding resistance.

However, what is the hole in a flute called?

embouchure hole
It is a tapered tube of around 22cm in length, with a 'lip-plate' and 'riser' soldered onto it, and a 'head-cork' assembly that seals the tapered end of the tube. The hole that the player blows into is called the 'embouchure hole'.

And, how long is a flute Headjoint?

You need to measure the length (LtoR) which should be about 12mm, Width (Rear to Front) which should be less than 10.5mm and then the diagonal which will vary from about 11.5 to 13mm. This is the approx size for most flutes.

Still, what does a flute Headjoint do?

Investigate Flute Embouchure Hole Size and Shape
A small hole has a sweet sound. An oval shape tends to be fluid and perform well in the upper octaves.The job of a flute headjoint maker is to bring out these qualities to their fullest while maintaining balance, color, and flexibility.

Moreover, what are the 3 joints of the flute called?

The flute has three main parts: the head joint, the body and the foot joint.

Next, how many valves does a flute have?

The flute used in an orchestra is usually made of silver metal, and with at least 13 tone holes controlled by valves.

Beside this, how many buttons does a flute have?

Traditionally, flutes had six or eight tone holes which allowed the flute to play in a single major key. The modern concert flute has 16 tone holes, or 17 if you count the low-B extension on high-quality concert flutes. Having this many keys allows the flutist to play in every key and generally play in tune.

Our Verdict

With so many Flute Head Joints available, it's difficult to know which one is best. Fortunately, our research team compiled an unbiased list of 13 best Flute Head Joints that will fit every budget. During this study there were over 61843 products across 13 brands. Our verdict: most customers choose Flute Head Joints with an average price tag of $564!

Joel Hammond
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joel Hammond is the CEO and Founder of, a company that specializes in wind instrument repairs and maintenance. He started the business as a way to connect with other musicians, but got serious about it after noticing how much people needed his services. Joel has been repairing instruments for over ten years now, and he’s seen all sorts of problems from broken keys to cracked seams! He enjoys spending time at home with his wife and two dogs.