Best Crash Cymbals

By Candace Stewart | Last Updated on Nov 14, 2021

In Hurry? Editor's Choice:

Zultan 16" Aja Crash
TOP 1
Zultan 16" Aja Crash
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Zildjian 16" A Custom Crash
TOP 2
Zildjian 16" A Custom Crash
TR score rating icon 9.7
TR Score
Zildjian 18" A Custom Crash
TOP 3
Zildjian 18" A Custom Crash
TR score rating icon 9.7
TR Score
How To Choose Crash Cymbals: Methodology

The best Crash Cymbals ranking is based on our detailed evaluation and analysis of over 357,834 consumer satisfaction surveys. We have come up with the top 3 Crash Cymbals you might be interested in and rated them on factors such as Alloy and Finish experience.

* Our experienced editors are constantly reviewing the latest news, looking at data analytics in order to recommend only products worth your time and money. As Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

A Detailed List of Top 3 Crash Cymbals in 2021

#TOP 1

Zultan 16" Aja Crash

Regular / Traditional
B20 Bronze

Reviews for Zultan (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

16&Quot;
Sounds Loud And Full-Bodied
The Sustain Behaviour Of The Cymbal Is Balanced And Harmonic
16&Quot;
Sounds Loud And Full-Bodied
The Sustain Behaviour Of The Cymbal Is Balanced And Harmonic
#TOP 2

Zildjian 16" A Custom Crash

1 Pounds
16 x 16 x 1.5 inches
A20514

Features

Beautiful, Warm Undertones.
One Of The Most Popular And In-Demand Zildjian Crash Cymbal Sounds
Speaks Very Quickly
Defines The Classic A Custom Sound
Bright, Well-Balanced
Beautiful, Warm Undertones.
One Of The Most Popular And In-Demand Zildjian Crash Cymbal Sounds
Speaks Very Quickly
Defines The Classic A Custom Sound
Bright, Well-Balanced

Zildjian 18" A Custom Crash

3 Pounds
18 x 18 x 2 inches
A20516

Features

Bright, Well-Balanced
Beautiful, Warm Undertones.
One Of The Most Popular And In-Demand Zildjian Crash Cymbal Sounds
Speaks Very Quickly
Defines The Classic A Custom Sound
Bright, Well-Balanced
Beautiful, Warm Undertones.
One Of The Most Popular And In-Demand Zildjian Crash Cymbal Sounds
Speaks Very Quickly
Defines The Classic A Custom Sound

Best Crash Cymbals — FAQ

How do you choose a crash cymbal?

Crash cymbals: When struck on their edge fairly hard with a stick, crash cymbals should have a good explosive sound that's not too long in duration. Sizes typically range from 14 to 18, and a nice 16 is a good size for starters. A general rule is the thicker the cymbal, the higher the pitch.

On the other hand, do you need two crash cymbals?

Im playing alternative rock or something like twenty one pilots? If i recall (new to this). Am i good with two crash cymbals only? Or one crash and one ride?

Thus, how many crash cymbals should I have?

Most modern kits usually have at least one or two crash cymbals. They can be played with sticks, your hands, or mallets to produce a wide range of tonal colors. Rock drummers sometimes hit two crashes at the same for an extra-powerful accent.

Then, how long should crash cymbals last?

On average, cymbals last for 5-10 years before they crack or wear out. How long a cymbal will last depends on the build quality of the cymbals, the drummer's playing technique, how often the cymbals are used, and how they are mounted on the cymbal stands.

Indeed, what is the difference between Splash and crash cymbals?

In a drum kit, splash cymbals are the smallest accent cymbals.Most splash cymbals are in the size range of 6" to 13", but some splash cymbals are as small as 4". Some makers have produced cymbals described as splash up to 22", but a splash of 14" or more is more often described as a crash cymbal.

Meanwhile, what is the difference between a ride cymbal and a crash cymbal?

Ride cymbals tend to be larger, and are used to keep the beat or to play a specific rhythmic pattern. They usually give off short, sharp sounds. A crash cymbal, on the other hand, is used mainly as an accent, producing a loud crash or a sustained swelling to add dynamics and expression to your song.

Still, how many cymbals does a beginner need?

Arrange your crash and ride cymbals
Typically, most drummers use one or two crash cymbals and one ride cymbal. Your ride cymbal should be set up to your right, usually just over the floor tom. If you're using one crash cymbal, set it up to the left of your kit somewhere between your snare drum and your mounted tom.

Also, why do metal drummers have so many cymbals?

Why do some drummers have so many cymbals? The most common reason for having more than one cymbal on a drum is to use cymbals to get a brighter or fuller sound. Some percussionists want to have a subtle sound, some want an aggressive sound and some want a combination.

Nonetheless, what are ride cymbals used for?

A ride cymbal is often the biggest cymbal in a typical beginner drum-kit (but not always), and in a right-handed kit is generally placed on the right above the floor tom. Whereas crash cymbals are typically used for accents, ride cymbals are used to play steady patterns, often in a similar manner to hi-hats.

Nevertheless, how many cymbals is enough?

Depends on the gigs you're playing, but most of the time hats and 2 cymbals, one with a short, sensitive crash and one with a clear ride and bell sound.

However, why do drummers have 2 crash cymbals?

Suspended crash cymbals are also used in bands and orchestras, either played with a drumstick or rolled with a pair of mallets to produce a slower, swelling crash. Sometimes a drummer may hit two different crash cymbals in a kit at the same time to produce a very loud accent, usually in rock music.

Our Verdict

With so many Crash Cymbals available, it's difficult to know which one is best. Fortunately, our research team compiled an unbiased list of 26 best Crash Cymbals that will fit every budget. During this study there were over 64381 products across 26 brands. Our verdict: most customers choose Crash Cymbals with an average price tag of $229!

Candace Stewart
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Candace Stewart - Dedicated to practicing drums and percussion, she has been playing the instruments from the age of 7 years. As an instructor of music at her local community college, Candace wishes to help others find their passion in life through music. In addition to teaching, her other hobbies include reading and watching films with friends or family members; she also enjoys cooking for people who are close to her heart. One of her favorite things about live is that there's always something exciting going on!