Best Bass Saxophone Reeds

By Joel Hammond | Last Updated on Nov 14, 2021

In Hurry? Editor's Choice:

Vandoren Classic Blue Bass Saxophone 2
TOP 1
Vandoren Classic Blue Bass Saxophone 2
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Vandoren Classic Blue Bass Saxophone 3
TOP 2
Vandoren Classic Blue Bass Saxophone 3
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
Marca Superieure Bass Saxophone 2.5
TOP 3
Marca Superieure Bass Saxophone 2.5
TR score rating icon 9.9
TR Score
How To Choose Bass Saxophone Reeds: Methodology

The best Bass Saxophone Reeds ranking is based on our detailed evaluation and analysis of over 2,160 consumer satisfaction surveys. We have come up with the top 3 Bass Saxophone Reeds you might be interested in and rated them on factors such as Strength and Material experience.

* Our experienced editors are constantly reviewing the latest news, looking at data analytics in order to recommend only products worth your time and money. As Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

A Detailed List of Top 3 Bass Saxophone Reeds in 2021

#TOP 1

Vandoren Classic Blue Bass Saxophone 2

2
Wood

Reviews for Vandoren (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Strength: 2.0
Strength: 2.0
#TOP 2

Vandoren Classic Blue Bass Saxophone 3

Wood
3

Reviews for Vandoren (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Strength: 3.0
Strength: 3.0
#TOP 3

Marca Superieure Bass Saxophone 2.5

2,5
Wood

Reviews for Marca (TA Score)

TR score rating icon 9.9

Features

Good Response
Durable
Very Good Quality
Package Contains 5 Reeds
Strength: 2.5
Good Response
Durable
Very Good Quality
Package Contains 5 Reeds
Strength: 2.5

Best Bass Saxophone Reeds — FAQ

How long should you play on reeds?

Reeds don't last long
This is why the reed is one of the most critical parts. Expect a reed to last for around a week to two weeks. When you change from a reed you've been using for some time to a new reed, the sound of your instrument will change with it.

Similarly, do saxophone reeds make a difference?

The thickness of the reed will affect the tone and how easy or difficult the instrument is to play. In general, a thinner reed, say 2 or 2.5, will have a brighter tone.Reeds with a thickness of 4 or 5 are harder and thus require more skill to sound, but the tone is fatter, bigger, and warmer.

On the other hand, how long should you soak saxophone reeds?

You should soak your reeds for about one minute with saliva. This ensures that the reed is moist enough to play well without being so wet that it becomes waterlogged. If the reed is brand new, you may want to soak it more thoroughly with water for about twenty minutes before working with it.

Thus, are saxophone reeds interchangeable?

But what is sometimes less obvious is that single reeds and double reeds generally aren't interchangeable between instruments. You usually can't exchange the reeds for various clarinets and saxes either. So, if you are a baritone sax player, don't use tenor sax reeds just because you found a great deal on them.

Also, when should I change reed strength?

Therefore, try to choose a strength that feels slightly hard when you start playing on a new reed, so it will feel just right as you break it in. When you've played on your reed for too long and it starts to feel too soft, it's time to start a new one!

Meanwhile, how can you tell if a reed is bad?

Old reeds that play mushy you should throw out. New reeds that play mushy, Clip. New reeds that play stiff, sand a little to soften. New reeds that play right out of the box.

Nevertheless, how do you break in a new saxophone reed?

Breaking In A New Reed
We suggest that you break the reeds in by first soaking them for about 2-4 minutes in lukewarm to warm water, and making sure that the whole vamp, and not just the tip alone, gets wet (a reed that is too dry or only wet at the very tip might tend to squeak).

Then, how can I be a good saxophonist?

Six Tips for Playing the Saxophone

  1. Practice Your Breathing. Not only does playing the saxophone require more breath than most instruments, but the flow of breath needs to be constant.
  2. Practice Consistently (and Often)
  3. Stick With a Position.
  4. Don't Forget the Dynamics.
  5. Choose Reeds Carefully.
  6. Take Care for Your Saxophone.

Beside this, why do you have to wet a reed?

Quite simply, by moistening your saxophone reed, you are making it easier to play ! The moisture makes it softer. And therefore this makes it easier for you to start it vibrating with a combination of your breath and your embouchure (face/mouth muscles).

Eventually, how do you keep reeds moist?

Fill a plastic jar with warm water and soak the reeds in the jar for 2 hours. Put the reeds back in their plastic covers. Dump the water out of the jar, but leave just a little bit at the bottom to keep in some moisture.

In addition, can you soak a reed for too long?

Then again, if you soak it for too long, it may end up becoming waterlogged, so try a balanced approach. And make sure you wet the reed each succeeding time you play thereafter, though you may find that as it gets broken in, less soaking time will be necessary.

And, how do you make reeds softer?

The easiest way to soften a reed is to use 400-600 grit sandpaper to remove some of the cane just above the bark (thicker part of the reed) as well as near the tip. Alternatively, you can gently bend the area beneath the tip of the reed up and down for about a minute, which makes it much softer.

Our Verdict

With so many Bass Saxophone Reeds available, it's difficult to know which one is best. Fortunately, our research team compiled an unbiased list of 13 best Bass Saxophone Reeds that will fit every budget. During this study there were over 54740 products across 13 brands. Our verdict: most customers choose Bass Saxophone Reeds with an average price tag of $40!

Joel Hammond
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joel Hammond is the CEO and Founder of, a company that specializes in wind instrument repairs and maintenance. He started the business as a way to connect with other musicians, but got serious about it after noticing how much people needed his services. Joel has been repairing instruments for over ten years now, and he’s seen all sorts of problems from broken keys to cracked seams! He enjoys spending time at home with his wife and two dogs.